Headshot of Pearl Veenema

A Message From Our CEO Pearl Veenema

I wanted to take the time to share some updates with you. Never before has the issue of health and health care been so front and centre as with the current COVID-19 situation. The entire health care system is working hard to keep our communities healthy and safe. The dedicated teams at Hamilton Health Sciences are on the front lines of this crisis – and we are thankful for all of their tireless efforts. Now more than ever, It’s Vital to Care.

AHP High Performer 2019 Logo

The Foundation Recognized as “High Performer” by AHP

We are honoured to be recognized once again as one of 10 “High Performer” health care foundations in Canada by the Association for Healthcare Philanthropy (AHP).

Dan with the Grey Cup.

An Uncle’s Legacy

Dan Maloney passed away at age 69 after a nearly 10-year battle with colon cancer. Thanks to a generous donation left in his will, Dan continues to make a vital difference for patients.

Eleanor Churchill smiles for a photo

Standing Strong after a Horrific Fall

Eleanor Churchill was 85 years old when she fell down a flight of stairs in her home.

Logo for Reel Rhapsody - Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation's 2020 Gala.

Gala 2020

Reel Rhapsody raised more than $450,000 for medical research at Hamilton Health Sciences.

Imagine Canada logo on a grey and red background.

Imagine Canada Reaccreditation

Imagine Canada applauded Hamilton Health Sciences Foundation for completing the reaccreditation process under its national Standards Program.

Karolyn Pinili smiles for a photo.

Two Strokes in Three Days

“I started to have double vision,” recalls Karolyn Pinili of Stoney Creek. “Something was definitely wrong, so I went to the Emergency Department at Hamilton General Hospital.”

Two senior patients dance at a gym.

Dancing to Better Health

An innovative research project is aiming to help seniors improve physical and mental health through dance. Read more

Anton poses for a photo.

Regaining Independence after a Stroke

“Something was wrong with my left hand. I couldn’t make it move.” Read more

Bob Bristo poses for a photo at St. Peter’s Hospital.

Learning to Walk Again

“My back pain was excruciating,” recalls Bob Bristo of Georgetown. “Then I began to experience weakness and paralysis in my legs. It kept getting worse until I could barely wiggle my toes.” Read more